Examining the significance of visual artifacts in Anlo traditional marriage system in the Volta region of Ghana

Authors

  • Godwin Gbadagba Department of Vocational/Technical Education, Dambai College of Education, Ghana
  • Ebenezer Kwabena Acquah School of Creative Arts, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana
  • Henry Empeh-Etseh Department of Vocational/Technical Education, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

Keywords:

Anlo, cultures, symbolism, traditional marriage, visual artifacts

Abstract

This study sought to examine the significance of visual artifacts used in Anlo traditional marriage system in the Volta Region of Ghana. Ethnographic research design embedded in the qualitative paradigm was adopted for the study. The purposive technique was used to sample ten (10) respondents; thus, a chief, an elder, and eight (8) married couples in Anyako. A multi-data collection technique comprising semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation was employed for data collection. The results identified various visual artifacts which were, the marriage stool, the marriage cloths (e.g., Achimotta, Haliwoe, Fiawoyome). Also, the study revealed that the wooden stool, “Atizikpui”, is a symbol of the woman's permanency and that she has come to stay forever. The philosophies and concepts behind these visual artifacts become the norms and ethics which bind society. Similarly, the society is taught to make artifacts not just for their aesthetics but also as a way of preserving the culture of the people. The study recommended that traditional leaders must continue to use occasions like durbars, festivals, and other ceremonies to sensitize their subjects on the importance of preserving their culture. This will educate the Anlos about the significance of visual artifacts in their marriage system and also provide good sources of reference materials for the future generation to continue the legacy.

Author Biographies

Godwin Gbadagba, Department of Vocational/Technical Education, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

Godwin Gbadagba is a Tutor in the Department of Vocational/Technical Studies at Dambai College of Education, Dambai. He obtained his M. Phil in Arts and Culture from University of Education, Winneba, Ghana in 2015. He has being an art Tutor at Dambai College of Education for the past 10 years. He is also an assistant examiner in College of Education. 

ORCID iD iconhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6170-3066

Ebenezer Kwabena Acquah, School of Creative Arts, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

Ebenezer Kwabena Acquah, PhD is an art educator, a Fulbright scholar, and book illustrator. Currently, he is a senior lecturer at the School of Creative Arts in the University of Education, Winneba (UEW) in Ghana. He had his doctoral degree in Art Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the United States. His research interest focuses on the influence of culture on artistic practices of learners; art teachers’ response to cultural policies; examining the visual representations of learners, and other related areas. He features prominently in the teaching of Art and Design at the University of Education, Winneba.

Henry Empeh-Etseh, Department of Vocational/Technical Education, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

Henry Empeh-Etseh is a Tutor in the Department of Vocational /Technical Studies at Dambai College of Education, Dambai. He obtained his M. A. in Arts and Culture from University of Education, Winneba, Ghana in 2013. He has been an Art Teacher at Obrachire Secondary Technical School from 2006 to 2008 and now a Tutor at Dambai College of Education for the past 12 years. He is also an assistant examiner in College of Education.

Dimensions

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Published

2020-09-03

How to Cite

Gbadagba, G., Acquah, E. K., & Empeh-Etseh, H. (2020). Examining the significance of visual artifacts in Anlo traditional marriage system in the Volta region of Ghana. Research Journal in Advanced Humanities , 1(4), 54-69. Retrieved from https://royalliteglobal.com/advanced-humanities/article/view/177

Issue

Section

Articles