Using a combination of activity methods to improve upon the understanding of the concept of heat conduction of basic school pupils in Kechebi circuit of Nkwanta South Munucipality, Ghana

Authors

  • Robert Kwame Kpaliba Department of Science, Dambai College of Education, Ghana
  • Mathew Tichem Tibamba Department of Science, Dambai College of Education, Ghana
  • Godwin Attitsogbui Department of Science, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

Keywords:

activity, conduction, demonstration, discussion

Abstract

The research work was primarily geared towards the improvement of pupils’ performance in Integrated Science for the Basic School pupils using the activity and demonstration methods. Purposive sampling technique was used to draw thirty-five (35) pupils for the study. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through observation, questionnaire and evaluation tests and descriptive statistics such as frequency tables and charts were used to describe the data. The study revealed inappropriate teaching methodologies, wrong perceptions about integrated science, inadequate learning materials for science were among the major causes of poor performance in Integrated Science. The study also showed how effective the activity and demonstration methods improved pupils’ understanding of the concept of heat conduction. Prior to intervention, pupils scored on the average of 25.35% marks in the pre-tests. After ministering the intervention, however, pupils’ performance in terms of average score rose to 71.2%. Using the t-test of significance, the difference between the two averages was found to be statistically significant at the 0.001, 0.05 and 0.10 levels of significance.  The activity and demonstration methods were also found to have had a significant impact on the understanding some basic concepts in science.

Author Biographies

Robert Kwame Kpaliba, Department of Science, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

a Robert Kwame Kpaliba is a Science Tutor and researcher at Dambai College of Education, He holds a Bachelor of Education, Science Education, and Master of Philosophy in Nuclear and Environmental Protection from the University of Education, Winneba, and the University of Ghana, Legon respectively. He is currently a PhD candidate in Physics at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. His main research area focuses on Science Education, climate change, and the effects of nanoparticles on the environment.

Mathew Tichem Tibamba, Department of Science, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

b Mathew Tibamba Tichem obtained his Bachelor of Education in Science Education and Master of Education. in Science Education from the University of Education, Winneba in Ghana in 2009 and 2015 respectively. He is currently a Science Tutor/Researcher at Dambai College of Education.

Godwin Attitsogbui, Department of Science, Dambai College of Education, Ghana

c Godwin Attitsogbui obtained his Bachelor of Education in Science Education and Master of Philosophy in Geophysics from the University of Cape Coast and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Ghana respectively. He is currently a Science Tutor/Researcher in the Department of Science at Dambai College of Education.

Dimensions

Agyemang, D.K. (1993). Sociology of Education for African Students. Accra: Black Mask Ltd.

Akey, T. M. (2006).School Context, Student Attitudes and Behaviour, and Academic Achievement: An Exploratory Analysis.

Avoke, M. (2005), Special education needs in Ghana: Policy, Practice and Research. Winneba: Special Educational Books.

Young, B.L. (1979). Teaching J.H.S science England: Longman House.

Charles, H. & Jack, P. (1977), Focus on physical science, London: Macmillan Publishers.

Dampson, D. G., & Dominic K. D. M. (2010).Parental involvement in home work for children’s academic success: A study in the cape coast municipality. Cape Coast,Ghana, Retrieved May, 21, 2010.Fromhttp//www.academiconline.org.

Eccles, J. S., & Harold, R. D. (1996). Family involvement in children's and adolescents' schooling. In A. Booth & J.F. Dunn (Eds.), Family-school links: How do they affect educational outcomes? (pp. 3–34). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Wragg, E. C. (1984), Classroom teaching skills, Great Britain: Crown Helm Press.

Wenham, E. J. et-al (1972), Physics, concepts and modes, England: Longman House.

Elizabeth, P. (1982), Effective teaching, New York: Addison Wesley Longman Inc.

Farrant, J. S. (1980). Principles and practice of education. London, England: English Language Book Society.

Flolu, E. J., et al (2007). Education in Ghana: Challenges for the 21st Century. Accra: Black Mask Ltd.

Grolnick, W. S. & Slowiaczek, M. L. (1994). Parents' involvement in children's schooling: A multidimensional conceptualization and motivation model. Child Development Journal, 65, 237–252.

Gaalen, E. & Tiberghien (1992), Heat and temperature, London: Oxford University Press.

Ikonta, R. N., (2008). An analysis of students’ performance in SSCE in public and private secondary schools in Lagos Metropolis in Nigeria: Implications for teacher training and productivity. Journal of research and development in education, vol.8, 35-44.

Jos, E. (1986), Encounter, interact, dialogue, Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd.

Ken, S. et-al (1989), Physics through application, London: Oxford University Press.

Maslow, A. H., (1968). Towards the Psychology of being. Princeton, New Jersey: Reinhold.

Marion, D. & Elizabeth, D. (1984). Teaching 3-9 years old, England: Ward Lock Educational Ltd.

Quansah, K. B. (July l977), Monitoring standards in basic education using Criterion Referenced Tests. Institute for Economic Affairs round table discussion Paper, Ghana Education Service, Accra.

Roy, R. (1992), An Early start to energy, London: Hermann Educational Books.

The World Bank (1996). Basic Education Sector Improvement Program. Staff appraisal report. Ghana: Africa Region. May 24, 1996.

Wynne, H. (1985). Taking the plunge, Canada: Fakenham Photo setting Ltd.

Wynne, H. and David, S. (1988). Helping children to observe, Great Britain: Bindles Ltd.

Young, B. I. (1989). Teacher job satisfaction: A study of the overall job satisfaction and work facet of K-8 teachers. Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI) 49 (7).

Published

2022-10-10

How to Cite

Kpaliba, R. K., Tibamba, M. T., & Attitsogbui, G. (2022). Using a combination of activity methods to improve upon the understanding of the concept of heat conduction of basic school pupils in Kechebi circuit of Nkwanta South Munucipality, Ghana. Research Journal in Advanced Sciences, 3(1). Retrieved from https://royalliteglobal.com/rjas/article/view/908

Issue

Section

Articles