COVID-19 Lockdown: A Review of an Alternative to the Traditional Approach to Research

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Dickson Adom
Mavis Osei
Joe Adu-Agyem

Abstract

This study aims to offer alternative ways of conducting research in the periods of lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic when the traditional research approaches are not feasible. This is crucial as some researchers hold the wrong perception that such difficult times are only fallow periods to focus on their personal and family problems. The study argues that there is the need for researchers to be busy carrying out investigations aimed at finding solutions to the multiplicity of problems faced by global communities as a result of the pandemic. Using desk research and document analysis of secondary data from published articles, the study discusses research approaches, particularly, alternative means of garnering primary and secondary data for investigating the COVID-19 pandemic from different academic disciplines. It posits that telephone and video conferencing interviews, text-based chats and e-surveys are alternative means for collecting primary data while secondary data from published articles and newspaper reports are viable means of generating reliable data for research. These alternative approaches to research would keep researchers busy in finding solutions to the difficult challenges faced during pandemics, the period their services are needed the most.

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How to Cite
COVID-19 Lockdown: A Review of an Alternative to the Traditional Approach to Research. (2020). Research Journal in Advanced Social Sciences, 1, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.58256/rjass.v1i.107
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Dickson Adom, Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

Dickson Adom is a researcher in the Department of Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, K.N.U.S.T., Ghana, and holds an extraordinary researcher position in the School of Economic Sciences at the Northwest University, South Africa. He has specialized in the use of Traditional Ecological Knowledge Systems for Biodiversity Conservation. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of his eduaction and training, his current research interests are in African Art and Culture, Cultural Tourism/e-Tourism, Art History, TEK for Biodiversity Conservation, Agricultural Anthropology, General Education, Environmental Sustainability Education and Research and Academic Writing.

Mavis Osei, Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

Mavis Osei is a Ghanaian Painter, Art Educator, Art Therapist and a Fulbright alumnus. She has a BA Art and a PhD Art Education from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology KNUST) in Ghana. She also has a Diploma in Mental Health Studies from Alison, Ireland and an MA Art (Clinical Art Therapy) from Long Island University, New York. She is an affable and dedicated Senior Lecturer in KNUST with ten years of university teaching experience demonstrating constant success as an Educator and Art Therapist in undergraduate and postgraduate education teaching courses like Educational Psychology, Psychology of Human Development and Learning, Art Therapy and Aesthetics and Criticism. She has also authored an Art Therapy postgraduate programme for the university, the first of its kind in the sub-region. Mavis has an array of publications to her credit. Currently, she is the Head of Department, Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, KNUST.

Joe Adu-Agyem, Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

Joe Adu Agyem is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, K.N.U.S.T., Ghana. He teaches Research and Academic Writing at the Postgraduate level. He has postgraduate theses for the past twenty years. He has specialized in Art Education, Aesthetics, Visual Arts and Research Methods. He is currently working on studies related to the improvement of thesis writing and research in postgraduate studies.  

How to Cite

COVID-19 Lockdown: A Review of an Alternative to the Traditional Approach to Research. (2020). Research Journal in Advanced Social Sciences, 1, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.58256/rjass.v1i.107

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